Board of Editors

CHAIRMAN
Howie G. Severino

SECRETARY
Ma. Pilar Marinez-Caedo

TREASURER
Dominick NA Danao

MEMBERS

Sheila S. Coronel
(FOUNDING EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR)

David Celdran

Lisa Gokongwei-Cheng

Cecile C.A. Balgos

Malou Mangahas

 

 

News for Sale
The Corruption and Commercialization of the Philippine Media, 2004 Edition
by Chay Florentino-Hofileña


No one in journalism will deny that media corruption exists. There is contention only in the extent of the corruption and the damage it causes. This book, a sequel to the 1998 publication, which is also entitled News for Sale, documents corruption as it takes place in the single most important political exercise in a democracy: elections.
This study shows both the remarkable continuity of the forms of media corruption as well as the new types of malfeasance that emerged in the 2004 campaign. As in the 1998 edition, this version of News for Sale relies heavily on documentation (such as rate cards of broadcast networks and solicitation letters sent by radio stations to politicians) and in-depth interviews with journalists, candidates, and the media handlers of politicians and political parties.
All the information that has been used here has been counter-checked with at least one other source. Moreover, the author used only information that her sources knew first hand. Some interviewees, however, refused to be identified by name, but in citing them, the author tried as much as possible to describe in what capacity the source was talking to her.
Chay Florentino-Hofileña, a veteran journalist and journalism educator, wrote both the 1998 and 2004 editions of News for Sale. This new edition was spurred by the realization that even as a large chunk of campaign budgets were going to political advertising, significant amounts of money were also being allocated to pay off journalists. Florentino-Hofileña also noted that because more and more celebrities entered politics, the entertainment press also strayed into political reporting. The forms of corruption that are the norm in the entertainment press were therefore introduced to the field of political coverage.
This book discusses outright corruption as well as more subtle conflict-of-interest situations that confront journalists and news executives. It is our hope that by bringing these problems out into the open, the media, the public, and the politicians can take steps to do something about them.
The media have emerged as probably the most important influence on how people vote. If the media do not perform well and if their coverage is skewed because of money and other considerations, then they do a disservice to citizens. They also stunt the development of electoral politics—and this could have tragic consequences on Philippine democracy.

 

Cockfight, Horserace, Boxing Match: Why Elections are Covered as Sport
Lessons Learned from the 2004 Campaign Coverage

by Sheila S. Coronel, Yvonne T. Chua, and Isagani de Castro Jr.


Media coverage of elections, in the Philippines and elsewhere, has been criticized for its superficiality. Critics have noted the propensity of the media, particularly television, to focus on personalities rather than issues and platforms. The media, it has been said, are consumed by the horserace or cockfight aspect of the campaign. Journalists cover elections as sport: Their reporting focuses on who’s leading and who’s losing out.
Sheila S. Coronel takes a look at how the media covered the 2004 elections, in an attempt to explain why the media report on events the way they do. She examines the process in which media content is produced and the individuals-reporters as well as newspaper editors and broadcast news managers-who are responsible for producing that content. She looks at the focus of the coverage and the factors that influence the direction of election reporting, including the bias of media owners, the manipulation by the media bureaus of campaign organizations, and the drive for ratings and sales.
Yvonne T. Chua examines in greater detail the reporters who covered the 2004 campaign. She looks at their preparedness for the coverage, their attitude toward their sources and their editors, the problems they faced, and the factors that limited their independence and autonomy.
Isagani de Castro talked to the chiefs of the media bureaus of the five presidential candidates and presents in this volume their own assessment of the media coverage. They criticized “soundbite journalism,” the fixation on ratings, and the lack of editorial direction. The media, they said, abandoned their agenda-setting function and allowed themselves to be swept by the tide of events and stories manufactured by the political campaigns.

 

The Rulemakers
How the Wealthy and Well-Born Dominate Congress

by Sheila S. Coronel, Yvonne T. Chua, Luz Rimban, and Booma B. Cruz


This book tells the story of the Philippine legislature by examining the men and women who make up that body. It looks at their demographic characteristics (age, gender, education, profession), their assets and sources of wealth, and also their family lineage.
What we found was troubling, but hardly news: Philippine legislators constitute a select and exclusive segment of society. They are richer, older, better educated, and better connected than the rest of us. The great majority of them are also part of families whose members have been in public office for two or more generations.
This book also shows how lawmakers have employed their powers to further enrich themselves and entrench their families in power. The powers to make laws, to conduct legislative inquiries, to examine the national budget, and to vet presidential appointments have been used by legislators to get benefits for themselves, their allies, and their kin.

 

The PCIJ Guide to Government
edited by Yvonne T. Chua and Sheila S. Coronel


This book is intended to be a road map. a manual, a guidebook to those who wish to understand how various branches and agencies of government work. Understanding government is key for any citizen who has to deal with the state and its various instrumentalities — whether it is to obtain information, to assert his/her rights, to demand accountability, or simply to satisfy his/her curiosity.
Written by veteran journalists, the book provides a basic backgrounder that explains the powers and functions of various officials and agencies, including the presidency, the legislature, and the courts. When necessary, it describes the structure of, and the key processes or procedures followed in, those agencies. Thus, readers will find in this book a table on how a bill becomes a law and a map on the procedures laid down for criminal cases. They will also find a flow chart explaining project cycles followed by state agencies tasked with implementing infrastructure and other projects. At the end of each chapter is a directory that lists important addresses, telephone numbers, and websites.
At the same time, the book tries to provide more depth by analyzing how various officials and agencies have exercised — even abused — their powers in the past. It shows how rules and procedures have been bent, mangled, or ignored in courtrooms, jails, even the august halls of Congress or Malacañang. The book pinpoints what citizens should watch out for, where the potential for abuse and malfeasance can occur.

 

Investigating Corruption: A Do-It-Yourself Guide
edited by Sheila S. Coronel and Lorna Kalaw-Tirol


The book is part of a series of manuals that the PCIJ has been publishing since 1995, is a how-to manual that instructs those interested in corruption—whether they are journalists, activists, government officials, academics, researchers, or plain concerned citizens—how to probe various forms of malfeasance.
Investigating Corruption is a user-friendly manual that is based largely on the experiences of PCIJ journalists. Among others, it gives tips on investigating officials, including checking their assets, lifestyles, and behavior. A special section in the book describes how the PCIJ uncovered former President Estrada’s millions and mansions.
The book also provides a guide to various human sources and documents that corruption investigators can use. The government’s complex procurements system is explained in the book, which also includes tips on how to spot whether anomalies in public biddings and the negotiation of contracts for government purchases. For the numerically inclined, the book explains how the scale and impact of corruption can be measured using various mathematical and statistical tools.
Other chapters provide instruction on probing corruption in the courts and in the environment sector. A guide to government agencies tasked with investigating graft, including the specific functions of these agencies, is also included. The last chapter of the book lists the NGOs involved in curbing corruption.

 

Memory of Dances
Photographs by Sonny Yabao, Text by Sheila S. Coronel


This is the story of the Tagbanua of Coron, Palawan, the Bugkalot and Igorot of Nueva Vizcaya, and the Manobo of Mount Apo. All of them are impoversihed peoples ranged against forces much more powerful than they — mining in Nueva Vizcaya, mass tourism in Palawan, a geothermal plant on Mount Apo. In all these places, the viability of indigenous communities is being challenged by business entities and government agencies, by the ever-increasing intrusion of the market and the state.
The story of the indigenous peoples of the Philippines is a chronicle of loss. Many of them have been dispossessed of their land, their culture destroyed, their forests and seas exploited by outsiders. Some tribes face extinction: their numbers are rapidly dwindling because the land and forests that sustained them have been taken by outsiders.
But theirs is not just a story of tragedy and loss. It is also one of recovery and hope. In all the places we visited, we found peoples who were intensely engaged with the world outside, fighting and negotiating, constantly improvising as they sought to change the terms of their engagement with the world outside. We saw the importance of culture and memory in breathing life into communities that once stood on the edge of disintegration and despair.
To indigenous peoples, the memory of dances — of their bodies swaying to the rhythm of ancient gongs — keeps their hope alive that one day they will recover the sacred ground that is the homeland of their ancestors. This book chronicles their struggle to change the course of the history that confines them.

 

The Right to Know: Access to Information in Southeast Asia
edited with an introduction by Sheila S. Coronel


PUBLISHED jointly by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism (PCIJ) and the Southeast Asian Press Alliance (Seapa), this book examines the state of the media in these countries and the obstacles faced by journalists and citizens who wish to obtain access to public records.
The book includes the findings of a cross-country survey that ranked the countries according to their openness. The Philippines and Thailand rank as the most transparent countries in Southeast Asia. Cambodia is third, although citizens rarely attempt to obtain information from the government, which they think is authoritarian and inaccessible Moreover, the information infrastructure is in shambles after the ravages of the Khmer Rouge.
In Indonesia, Suharto-era restrictions on information disclosure remain in place, although the press is free and able to report on areas of public life previously closed to scrutiny.
In Singapore and Malaysia, paternalistic but restrictive governments keep citizens in thrall while giving them a taste of the good life. In recent years, there has been some opening up in information access in these countries as governments responded to the demands of global business for more economic information in the wake of the crisis that struck East Asia in the late 1990s. At the same time, however, these governments have refused to be more forthcoming in releasing information on other aspects of political and social life.
In Vietnam, the Communist Party dominates the media and wide areas of public life. The least transparent country in the region is Burma, where all media are mouthpieces of the junta and virtually no information is available to the public. Burma also has the most restrictive press laws in the region, and perhaps the world.
For the longest time, the rulers of Southeast Asia maintained political control through information control. Since the late 1980s, however, such stranglehold has been challenged by democracy movements, technological advances and the increasing integration of regional economies into global trade and finance. In Indonesia, the Philippines and Thailand, the media have played an important role in providing citizens information on the excesses of authoritarian regimes. Today, in these countries, a free press provides a steady stream of information on corruption, the abuse of power and assorted forms of malfeasance.
The Southeast Asian experience has shown that the struggle for freedom of information cannot be taken separately from the struggle for democracy. The most significant openings in information access have come about as part of a package of democratic reforms. These reforms, in turn, were the product of citizens’ involvement in pro-democracy movements; they would not have been possible if left to the initiative of leaders or legislatures.
“Southeast Asian governments do not open up of their own accord,” says the book. “They have to be pried open.”

 

Drugs, Death and Disease: Reporting on AIDS in Southeast Asia
edited by Cecile C.A. Balgos


THE MEDIA tend to sensationalize AIDS, often focusing on the more scandalous aspects of the private lives of those with HIV/AIDS victims, without shedding light on the complexity of the contagion. Often, those with the disease are portrayed as the culprits behind the spread of the disease, thus contributing to the social ostracism that people with AIDS suffer. Sometimes, reporters even get it wrong, propagating wrong notions about the disease and contributing to the public’s misinformation about HIV/AIDS.
Even when journalists get it right and take a more holistic view, they have tended to look at the epidemic in a one-dimensional way: as a public health problem, or as an issue related to the sex industry, drug use or military prostitution. AIDS is all of these, but also more than all of these. To succeed in the battle against AIDS, the epidemic must be viewed in a multidimensional way, as a phenomenon rooted in society and tightly linked to social ills.
This is not easy to do, given the tight deadlines that journalists generally have to work with and the inadequate information that is available to them. This book aims to help Southeast Asian journalists grapple with the complex issues related to HIV/AIDS.
It is intended to be a map, a guide, a tool for reporters who write on this and related health and social issues. It is helpful to others as well, including officials, policymakers, activists and citizens who wish to know more about an epidemic that is claiming lives, sucking up resources, and undermining the efforts of many Southeast Asian societies to provide a better life for their peoples.

 

Investigating Local Governments: A Manual for Reporters
edited by Cecile C.A. Balgos


THIS MANUAL attempts to provide journalists with a local governance roadmap that would guide them in their day-to-day coverage of the news. But it is useful to others as well -officials, researchers, activists and ordinary citizens who wish to know more about governance at the local level.
This book begins with a scrutiny of the community press and its unique features and problems. It then dissects how local governments work (or are supposed to work) and includes helpful hints on how journalists can make sense of what is going on at the local level. In a simple but exhaustive discussion on local fiscal administration, one of the chapters shows how reporters and citizens can follow the money trail in their pursuit of wrongdoing. Another chapter focuses on the basic services that have been devolved to local government units, and points out the kinds of leads and sources a reporter can use to explain all these to the average reader.
The Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism put out this book in recognition of the fact that community journalists have to deal with a difficult terrain that is marked by political pressures, limited resources, intimidation and threats. But there is also a lack of understanding among community journalists of what local governance is all about and how local governments work. It is hoped that this book will help deepen their understanding and encourage them to blaze new trails in reporting.

 

Investigating Estrada
edited by Sheila S. Coronel
Finalist: National Book Award for Journalism (2000)


THE PHILIPPINE Center for Investigative Journalism (PCIJ) began its research on President Joseph Estrada’s wealth in the first quarter of 2000. The direction of our research was determined by what could be documented. Thus, one track of our investigation focused on the acquisition of real estate and the construction of houses. The second track focused on the formation of corporations by members of President Estrada’s various families.
What we found was a President who accumulated so much money in his first two-and-a-half years in office that he was able to purchase, through dummies and shell companies, over P2 billion worth of real estate for his various wives and children. We also found a pattern of corporate formation by presidential mistresses. We uncovered 66 companies in which Estrada, his wives and children were listed as incorporators or board members.
Fourteen of these companies alone have assets of over P600 million. Yet the President declared a net worth of only P35.8 million in 1999 and a net income of only P2.3 million that same year.
Our findings on President Estrada’s unexplained wealth and his propensity for acquiring real estate and building mansions were published in a series of articles in the second half of 2000. In October 2000, three of the PCIJ’s reports were included in the impeachment complaint against the President.
Investigating Estrada collects in one volume the PCIJ’s groundbreaking investigations on Estrada’s wealth. It also includes articles that examine the President’s unorthodox lifestyle, his keen appreciation of the perks of public office, his “Midnight Cabinet,” and his use of the powers of the presidency to enrich himself.

 

Betrayals of the Public Trust: Investigative Reports on Corruption
edited by Sheila S. Coronel
Winner: National Book Award for Journalism (2000)


THE INVESTIGATIVE reports in this book were written between 1990 and 2000, a decade that spanned the administrations of three democratically elected presidents. During that period, the integrity of democratic institutions, which were re-established after the fall of Ferdinand E. Marcos in 1986, was challenged by charges of corruption and malfeasance. Virtually no office, including the Supreme Court and the Office of the President, was spared.
The reports included in this volume show the range of corruption that can be found in various areas of governance: from high-level political corruption in Malacañang and Congress to low-level corruption in local governments.
This book shows how the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism (PCIJ) has researched and put together investigative reports on corruption. All the articles in this collection come with an explanation of the research and reporting methods that were used by the journalists who wrote them. The documents that were obtained, the interviews conducted, and the other sources for the story are listed. The use of other techniques, such as computer databases or immersion in communities, is also explained. In addition, how stories are developed—by, for example, using case studies or establishing a pattern of irregularities—is discussed. The impact of the reports is also mentioned.

 

From Loren to Marimar: The Philippine Media in the 1990s
edited by Sheila S. Coronel
Winner: National Book Award for Media (1999)


THIS COLLECTION is must reading for anyone interested in how one of the most influential sectors in Philippine society operates: the media. The 35 articles in this anthology examine the structure of Philippine newspapers and television, describe Filipino forays into the World Wide Web, and probe such problems as ethics and ownership. They also trace how, in just a decade, the media in the Philippines have become as powerful as they are now. One of the things this collection explains is why media personalities have found their way into politics and why politicians are lining up to be news anchors or talk show hosts.
This anthology paints a portrait of the Philippine media in the 1990s: rowdy, free and noisy but also vulnerable to pressure and harassment. These articles, first published by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism (PCIJ) in newspapers and in i magazine, provide a fresh perspective on the problems and issues that confront the Philippine media at the turn of the millennium. Trenchant and well-researched, they focus an unflinching eye on the strengths and weaknesses of the media.
This book is meant for students, media users, researchers, officials and ordinary citizens who wish to understand the often anarchic way in which one of the most powerful institutions in out society works. From Loren to Marimar does not mince words. These articles were written by journalists who have harnessed their investigative skills to examine their own trade. They did not always like what they found.

 

Robbed: An Investigation of Corruption in Philippine Education
by Yvonne T. Chua
Winner: National Book Award for Journalism (1999)


THE DEPARTMENT of Education Culture and Sports (DECS) provides a classic case of corruption in the Philippines. Nearly all forms of corruption described in academic texts can be found in the department: from low-level bureaucratic corruption to high-level political corruption involving education officials, legislators, and Cabinet secretaries. The result is an education bureaucracy so ridden with graft that it is barely able to deliver the most basic educational services to the country’s 15 million public school students.
This investigation shows in graphic detail how corruption permeates all levels of the public educational system, from the DECS central office in Pasig to the school on a remote island in the fringes of the archipelago. Corruption assumes various forms, from petty or survival corruption engaged in by lowly clerks who sit on papers until suppliers cough up grease money to top-level corruption where policy-makers at the Pasig or regional offices change, bend or breach the rules to favor suppliers that come up with bribes.
The areas most vulnerable to corruption are procurement and recruitment. Money changes hands at nearly every stage of procurement, from the accreditation to the payment of suppliers. Money is also given out from the time a teacher applies for a job up to the time she requests for a change in assignment or works for a promotion. In some cases, expensive gifts replace money in cash-less transactions that take place in the education bureaucracy.
Embezzlement, nepotism, influence peddling, fraud and other types of corruption also flourish. Corruption has become so institutionalized that payoffs have become the lubricant that makes the education bureaucracy run smoothly. The result: an entire generation of Filipino students robbed of their right to a good education.

 

Her Stories: Investigative Reports on Filipino Women in the 1990s
edited by Cecile C.A. Balgos
Finalist: National Book Award for Journalism (1999)


THIS COLLECTION of investigative reports published in major Philippine newspapers from 1995 to 1999 chronicles the travails and triumphs of Filipino women in the last decade of the 20th century.
During this decade, the country’s first female president ended her term, more women were elected to the legislature, and several laws recognizing the rights of women were passed. At the same time, there was also a “feminization” of some of the Philippines’s most serious problems: poverty, unemployment, malnutrition, and the social consequences brought about by large-scale overseas migration.
This anthology of reports written by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism (PCIJ) paints a portrait of the Filipina in the 1990s: challenged by poverty and need, often overlooked by policy makers, but also surviving and prevailing despite the odds.
Her Stories shows that even in the direst circumstances, women refuse to give up. This book tells the story of these women’s suffering but also shows how women remain undaunted, and how they have managed to pull through, guided by the conviction that they deserve better.

 

News in Distress: The Southeast Asian Media in a Time of Crisis
edited by Cecile C.A. Balgos
Finalist: National Book Award for Documentation (1999)


WHILE OFFICIALS and experts are still arguing about the real causes of what is now called the “Asian crisis,” one thing seems clear: There was lack of information that would have allowed officials, businesspeople and ordinary citizens to anticipate the crisis, understand its causes, and deal with its impacts.
How such paucity of information could exist in the so-called “Information Age” points to the contradictions in Southeast Asian societies. On one hand, the booming countries of the region had opened their economies to transnational capital flows, encouraged foreign investments and embarked on an ambitious path to growth based on integration into the global economy. On the other hand, in many of these countries, long reigning leaders have tried to keep their citizens on a tight leash, restricting freedom of expression and flows of information that they think would threaten their regimes.
News in Distress looks at the problems facing the Southeast Asian media in this era of economic contagion, examining such issues as State control, the tyranny of anarchic media markets, and the challenges and opportunities brought about by democratization, globalization and market deregulation on the region’s mass media.

 

News for Sale: The Corruption of the Philippine Media
by Chay Florentino-Hofileña
Finalist: National Book Award for Journalism (1998)


MEDIA CORRUPTION is not an easy subject for journalistic investigation. In this unprecedented work, Chay Florentino-Hofileña looks at the history of media corruption in the Philippines, probes corrupt practices in the 1990s, and discovers how a free press can be bought.
This study shows that compared to the past, media corruption in the post-Marcos era is costlier, more pervasive, and even more systemic. It is also disturbingly sophisticated, and in some cases, even institutionalized. The organized way in which corruption takes place—through a network of journalists reporting to other journalists or to professional public relations or PR people—makes it seem almost like the operation of a criminal syndicate, a mafia of corrupt practitioners.
News for Sale takes a close look at journalistic corruption during the 1998 presidential elections. Its findings are shocking, but it also shows what efforts are being taken to address the problem.

 

Pork and other Perks: Corruption and Governance in the Philippines
Edited by Sheila S. Coronel
Winner: National Book Award for Journalism (1998)


CORRUPTION is an issue as old as governance itself. Filipinos therefore tend to be cynical about corruption in government. They are shocked that public officials are corrupt, although they may sometimes marvel at the magnitude of the thievery.
Yet more and more Filipinos are now raising issues about the effectiveness of government performance, the accountability of government institutions, and the transparency of government agencies. They have realized that democracy in itself does not ensue that government officials and institutions are immune to the corruption that plagued authoritarian regimes.
This book tries to address these concerns. In nine well-documented case studies, some of the country’s best investigative reporters show why corruption persists and what is being done to stop it. These case studies reveal the fallibility of individuals and institutions. They also show how democratization, economic growth, and liberalization bring about new temptations and new forms of abuse.
Pork and other Perks is a pioneering work. It exposes the many facets of corruption in the Philippines and pinpoints who is responsible. But this book goes beyond muckraking to examining the social structures and the institutions that breed graft. It also examines what can be done about it.

 

Uncovering the Beat: The Real-World Guide to Reporting on Government
edited by Yvonne T. Chua
Finalist: National Book Award for Journalism (1997)


This easy-to-use reference book compiles information on the workings of key government institutions: the presidency, Congress, the courts, the police, the agencies that regulate the economy and the environment, and those that provide education and health services.
It describes the structure of these institutions and the laws that govern them. It explains how these agencies work and untangles the often arcane procedures that govern their operation. Government is a maze, and Uncovering the Beat is a guide to that maze.
A road map, survival guide and security blanket, this book is meant for reporters, journalism students and others who wish to learn more about the current practice of day-to-day journalism—and also day-to-day governing—in the Philippines. It is a practical guide that goes into what the President of the Republic can do, how a law is made and how the criminal justice system is supposed to operate. Uncovering the Beat lays down the rules as they are written in the books, but it also gets real, by describing how the rules are bent, mangled, ignored in courtrooms, jails, even the august halls of Congress.

 

The Electronic Trail
Computer-assisted Research and Reporting in the Philippines

by Danilo A. Arao, Yvonne T. Chua and Alecks P. Pabico
Finalist: National Book Award for Journalism (1997), out of print


THE DIGITAL revolution has had profound consequences on the way of doing journalism. Computers and modems have made it possible to transmit almost instantaneously large amounts of information from anywhere on the planet with a telephone. But more than that, the new technology has also made available to journalists a whole new world of research and reporting possibilities.
This book provides reader-friendly guides to using available computer software and maximizing the use of electronic databases, online libraries, email, newsgroups, electronic bulletin boards, listservs, and of course, the land of promise called the World Wide Web. The Electronic Trail also cites the real-life examples of journalists who have done trail-blazing research and reporting using precisely these resources.
Although addressed specifically to journalists, this manual is also intended for other researchers—in schools, companies, government and NGOs—who are interested in using the full potential of their computers for their work.

 

Women in Brackets: A Chronicle of Vatican Power and Control
by Marilen J. Dañguilan, MD


MARILEN Dañguilan has been a warrior in a war of liberation, and this book is a chronicle of that war—the war for women’s bodies, women’s rights, and women’s choices.
The stories that Marilen tells may bear familiar outlines, especially for those who followed the back-and-forth between Church and State around the time of the Cairo and the Beijing women’s conference. But her accounts of these skirmishes acquire an entertaining edge by the deft way she sketches characters, her sense of irony and the telling detail, and the way she builds up suspense as the fraying edges of public opinion threaten to rip apart the social fabric.
This account of the struggles for the high ground of public opinion and policy on the issue of reproductive rights is not just informative and entertaining. It is important. And it is important because reproductive rights is a central issue for women. If we do not have the freedom to make basic decisions about whether, when, how often and by whom we will get pregnant, all our other liberties are imperiled as well. --Rina Jimenez-David

 

Comfort Woman: Slave of Destiny
by Maria Rosa Henson


In this gripping autobiography, Ma. Rosa Henson recalls her childhood as the illegitimate daughter of a big landowner, her wartime ordeal and her decision to go public with a secret she had kept for fifty years.

 

Patrimony: 6 Case Studies on Local Politics and the Environment in the Philippines
edited with an introduction by Sheila S. Coronel
Winner: National Book Award for Journalism (1996), out of print


IN 1995, the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism (PCIJ) published the award-winning Boss: 5 Case Studies of Local Politics in the Philippines. In Patrimony, some of the country’s best investigative reporters focus their investigative skills on the link between local politics and the environment, examining how democratization and devolution have affected the way resources are managed at the local level. Patrimony looks at the structures of local power and explains how those who hold local office use their power to exploit, or in some cases protect, natural resources.
This collection ventures into new territory by identifying emerging trends and social forces augur well for the environment. Ten years since the fall of Ferdinand Marcos, democracy and decentralization have unleashed positive changes. The Local Government Code, enacted in 1991, has empowered communities, giving them the clout to protect their resources. But they have also enhanced the prerogatives of local officials, some of whom are the biggest resource-exploiters in their areas.
Democracy has allowed Green groups to organize freely and given free rein to an unmuzzled press that has exposed environmental abuse. Increasing public pressure, especially in the wake of major natural disasters, has also prompted the government to act, in many instances, as an impartial arbiter of environmental disputes.
But the struggle is far from over. Very real stumbling blocks—entrenched economic interests, unsustainable development strategies and bureaucratic inertia—stand in the way of correcting the way in which natural resources are managed.

 

Boss: 5 Case Studies of Local Politics in the Philippines
edited by Jose F. Lacaba
Winner: National Book Award for Journalism (1995), out of print


FOR THE last hundred years, politicians have died, and killed, for the perks of local office—including control of substantial revenues, as well as cuts from pork barrel funds, government contracts, even jueteng and smuggling operations.
In 1991, Congress passed the Local Government Code which devolved power to local government units. The Code shifts the locus of power from manila to the regions. For the first time in Philippine history, local governments now have the authority and potentially, also the resources, to become independent power centers.
These changes also mean that local office is now more lucrative than ever. That is why local elites are contesting municipal and provincial government posts with renewed intensity.
Boss looks at five areas in the Philippines and examines what is at stake in the struggle for local office. It describes the political and economic geography of these areas and explains why, despite urbanization and economic growth, local clans, warlords and politicians remain powerful.

 

The Green Guide: A Sourcebook on the Philippine Environment, 2nd edition
edited by Howie G. Severino
Finalist: National Book Award for Environment (1995)


THE GREEN Guide is the most comprehensive reference manual on the Philippine environment. Published by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism (PCIJ), this book is an essential guide for environmental reporters, but should just be as useful for researchers, students, activists, and others interested in the country’s environment. In addition to essays by journalists Marites Dañguilan-Vitug and Howie G. Severino, and environmental lawyers Ipat G. Luna and Armand Mejia, the book contains:

  • directories of government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, international environment groups, international financing institutions, environment experts, industry associations, consultancy firms, and resource centers
  • lists of endangered species
  • an index of Philippine laws pertaining to the environment
  • a guide to the Internet as a research tool
  • a glossary of relevant terms
  • various maps
  • a bibliography of selected environment reference books

 

Power from the Forest: The Politics of Logging
by Marites Dañguilan-Vitug
Winner: National Book Award for Journalism (1993)


THE PHILIPPINE forests have been the most coveted among its natural resources, and the few who have been granted the privilege of taming portions of them have reaped power and wealth.
Power from the Forest is the story of logging in the Philippines, the story of the exercise of power—who wields it, who benefits from it and how.
The dangerous intertwine of forests and politics was most glaring under Ferdinand Marcos. In bestowing upon himself the power to grant and revoke logging licenses, Marcos deftly used the forests as a political tool.
The insurgency war had bred new logging interests—the rebels and the military who have made the forests their battleground and their sources of income.
But amidst this gloomy foreboding, there are shafts of light. The indigenous peoples and rural folk who have lived in or around these forests are starting to stir as well as a growing number of nongovernmental organizations and concerned individuals.
Marites Dañguilan-Vitug harnesses her investigative skills to tell us the tragic story of the Philippine forests, the people who continue to plunder them and those who are trying to protect them.

 

Saving the Earth: The Philippine Experience, 4th edition
edited by Cecile C.A. Balgos
Winner: National Book Award for Anthology (1992)


SAVING THE Earth us mostly about what happens when humans abuse nature. In the Philippines, the problem has become two-fold. For more than three decades, the country’s environment crisis consisted mainly of the effects of almost half a century of unrestricted logging. Efforts to rehabilitate the uplands have been stalled by bureaucratic ineptitude and corruption. Mining has also contributed its share of blight, but the industry’s area of operations has so far been more limited than logging’s.
While authorities and communities are still wrestling with this “first generation” environmental crisis, the second generation of problems has arrived, in the form of pollution, land conversion and the other consequences of economic growth. This double whammy of upland degradation and urban decay threatens to overwhelm the government bureaucracies tasked to deal with both simultaneously. Lacking resources, officials will concentrate only on those issues that the public is most agitated about.
This book seeks both to describe the effects and analyze the causes of some of the greatest environmental afflictions bedeviling the nation. It contains 37 of the best environment reports published by the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism (PCIJ) from 1989 to 1997.

 


Special Interest Books

Pipol Power Uli! (2001)
The Ultimate Textbook: An I Book (2000)
Joke ni Erap: A Jokebook to Support Serious Journalism (1999)

 

Videos

Mga Palasyo ni Erap
Basura
Graftbusters: Kontra Kurakot
Behind the Veil: Voices of Moro Women
No Time for Play
No More Sabado Nights
Toxic Sunset: On the Trail of Hazardous Waste from Subic and Clark
Luzon: Disaster and Hope (Fast Track to Poverty)
Mga Palasyo ni Erap
The Public’s Eye: Investigative Reports, 1989-1999

 

Malou Mangahas

Executive Director

Floreen Simon

Training Director

Karol Anne Ilagan

Senior Content Producer

John Nelvin Lucero

Researcher

Dona S. Lopez

Administrative Manager

Rachel Z. Abanilla

Administrative Staff

R-Jay Sale

Platform Architect

Lloyd Macalalad

Platform Architect

Justin Oliver Fiestada

Data Specialist

Tiana Rose Norfi Tayam

Junior Information Specialist

Online Investigative Reporting

PCIJ stories on governance win top honors at the National Statistics Month (NSM) Media Awards of the National Statistical Coordination Board. Executive Director Malou Mangahas won the Outstanding Award for Print and Broadcast for “her contribution in promoting and communicating reports on GMA News TV’s Investigative Documentaries and her various stories for PCIJ, “which enable statistics to reach out to a wider audience.” PCIJ Research Director Karol Anne M. Ilagan won the award for the Online Investigative Reporting.

Recipient: Karol Anne M. Ilagan

Date given: 2011

Story:

Outstanding Award for Print and Broadcast

PCIJ stories on governance win top honors at the National Statistics Month (NSM) Media Awards of the National Statistical Coordination Board. Executive Director Malou Mangahas won the Outstanding Award for Print and Broadcast for “her contribution in promoting and communicating reports on GMA News TV’s Investigative Documentaries and her various stories for PCIJ, “which enable statistics to reach out to a wider audience.” PCIJ Research Director Karol Anne M. Ilagan won the award for the Online Investigative Reporting.

Recipient: Malou Mangahas

Date given: 2011

Story:

WikiPinoy of the Year

PCIJ Executive Director Malou Mangahas named “WikiPinoy of the Year” by WikiPilipinas, the online collaborative encyclopedia based in the Philippines, for her “very significant contribution to knowledge sharing in the Philippines by steadfastly advocating the passage of the Freedom of Information Act.” The WikiPilipinas editors said the award is usually given to people who have empowered the public by providing pen information and in-depth insights on the more significant issues affecting the country and its citizens.”

Recipient: Malou Mangahas

Date given: 2010

Story:

First Humanitarian Reporting Awards

PCIJ Multimedia Director Ed Lingao wins First Prize in the First Humanitarian Reporting Awards of the Committee of the International Red Cross in the Philippines, for his reports and documentaries on media killings and the Ampatuan political dynasty in Maguindanao.

Recipient: Ed Lingao

Date given: 2010

Story:

Marshall McLuhan Awardee

PCIJ Multimedia Director Ed Lingao named “Marshall McLuhan Awardee,” for his reports on “The Guns of Maguindanao” and his documentary, “The Maguindanao Massacre, Year One,” by the Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility and the Embassy of Canada in the Philippines.

Recipient: Ed Lingao

Date given: 2010

Story:

Breaking Borders Awards

The Breaking Borders Awards for outstanding web projects that “demonstrate courage, energy and resourcefulness in using the internet to promote freedom of expression,” from Google, Thomson Reuters and the Global Voices community of bloggers across the world, given in Santiago, Chile.

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2010

Story:

Kate Webb Award

The Agence France-Presse’s Kate Webb Award “for exceptional journalism work in difficult or dangerous circumstances,” given in Manila, the Philippines.

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2010

Story:

AJA Award for Press Freedom

AJA Award for Press Freedom from the Asia Journalists Association (AJA), an organization of journalists from over 20 countries throughout Asia, given in Seoul, South Korea.

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2009

Story:

Top 100 Philippine Blogs

One of Top 100 Philippine Blogs from the Daily Reviewer given to www.pcij.org/blog based on a vote of readers.

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2009

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative and Explanatory Category)

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative and Explanatory Category) – given to PCIJ fellow Roel Landingin for the three-part series on official development assistance (ODA) published on February 11-14, 2008 in the Philippine Star, Malaya, ManilaTimes and Sun.Star Cebu

Recipient: Roel Landingin

Date given: 2009

Story:

Recognition from the 4th Annual PopDev Media Awards

Recognition from the 4th Annual PopDev Media Awards – given to Solita “Winnie” Monsod by the Legislator’s Committee on Population and Development Foundation, Inc., United Nations Population Fund, the Screening Committee and the Board of Judges

Recipient: Solita "Winnie" Monsod

Date given: 2008-11-25

Story:

Best Feature from the 4th Annual PopDev Media Awards

Best Feature from the 4th Annual PopDev Media Awards – given to PCIJ fellow Isa Lorenzo for “A Feminine Challenge” published on i Report series, “All About Eba”

Recipient: Isa Lorenzo

Date given: 2008-11-25

Story:

Runner-up for Best Feature Category from the 4th Annual PopDev Media Awards

Runner-up for Best Feature Category from the 4th Annual PopDev Media Awards – given to PCIJ contributor Solita Monsod for “Tracking the Women’s Journey” published on i Report series, “All About Eba”

Recipient: PCIJ contributor Solita Monsod

Date given: 2008-11-25

Story:

Runner-up for Best Investigative Category from the 4th Annual PopDev Media Awards

Runner-up for Best Investigative Category from the 4th Annual PopDev Media Awards – given to Alecks Pabico for his two-part series on the politics and the contentious issues that delayed the passage of the cheaper medicines law.

Recipient: Alecks Pabico

Date given: 2008-11-25

Story:

Runner-up for Best Investigative Category from the 4th Annual PopDev Media Awards

Runner-up for Best Investigative Category from the 4th Annual PopDev Media Awards – given to Jaileen Jimeno and Karol Ilagan for their three-part series on how the administration is falling behind key indicators for education.

Recipient: Jaileen Jimeno and Karol Ilagan

Date given: 2008-11-25

Story:

Runner-up for Best News Reportage Category from the 4th Annual PopDev Media Awards

Runner-up for Best News Reportage Category from the 4th Annual PopDev Media Awards – given to Jaileen Jimeno for the blog “Low investment in education consigns millions to illiteracy;” “Arroyo urged to adopt coherent national population policy;” and “RP failing in ‘gut-level’ MDG indicators-ADB.”

Recipient: Jaileen Jimeno

Date given: 2008-11-25

Story:

Top Prize (Governance Category) from the Developing Asia Journalism Awards (DAJA)

Top Prize (Governance Category) from the Developing Asia Journalism Awards (DAJA) – given to Alecks P. Pabico for “People Power Thrives in Naga City” published on April 29, 2007, part of the PCIJ’s i Report series on local “faces of change”.

Recipient: Alecks P. Pabico

Date given: 2008-11-14

Story:

Runner-up (Infrastructure Category) from the Developing Asia Journalism Awards (DAJA)

Runner-up (Infrastructure Category) from the Developing Asia Journalism Awards (DAJA) – given to PCIJ fellow Roel Landingin for “Bids Sans Caps, Tied Loans Favor Foreign Contractors” published on February 12, 2008, second in a three-part series on official development assistance to the Philippines.

Recipient: Roel Landingin

Date given: 2008-11-14

Story:

Web Award Winner from the Digital Filipino (Podcast Category)

Web Award Winner from the Digital Filipino (Podcast Category)– given to PCIJ for its excellence to successfully harness the Internet for business development and e-commerce

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2008-11-05

Story:

Philippine Development Innovation Marketplace (Panibagong Paraan-Project Grant Competition)

Finalist from the Philippine Development Innovation Marketplace (Panibagong Paraan-Project Grant Competition) – given to the PCIJ for the “Suriin ang Kahirapan: A Community Audit of Poverty in the Philippines”

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2008-04-09

Story:

3rd Annual PopDev Media Awards

Recognition from the 3rd Annual PopDev Media Awards – given to Lala Ordenes-Cascolan for “A Mother’s Breastfeeding Story”, an online investigative reporting from October 1, 2006- August 15, 2007 by the Philippine Legislator’s Committee on Population and Development Foundation, Inc., United Nations Population Fund, Population and Development Strategies Cluster-UNFPA 6th Country Programme, Screening Committees and the Board of Judges for the Print and Online Categories

Recipient: Lala Ordenes-Cascolan

Date given: 2007-11-27

Story:

3rd Annual PopDev Media Awards

Recognition from the 3rd Annual PopDev Media Awards – given to Maitet Diokno-Pascual and Clarence Pascual for “Walking on a Knife’s Edge”, an online opinion writing from October 1, 2006- August 15, 2007 by the Philippine Legislator’s Committee on Population and Development Foundation, Inc., United Nations Population Fund, Population and Development Strategies Cluster-UNFPA 6th Country Programme, Screening Committees and the Board of Judges for the Print and Online Categories

Recipient: Maitet Diokno-Pascual and Clarence Pascual

Date given: 2007-11-27

Story:

3rd Annual PopDev Media Awards

Citation from the 3rd Annual PopDev Media Awards – given to Jose Enrique Soriano for “Indisputable Hunger”, best photo, for making a significant difference in the amount and accuracy of public knowledge of population and human development issues affecting the lives of Filipinos from October 1, 2006- August 15, 2007 by the Philippine Legislator’s Committee on Population and Development Foundation, Inc., United Nations Population Fund, Population and Development Strategies Cluster-UNFPA 6th Country Programme, Screening Committees and the Board of Judges for the Photojournalism Special Category

Recipient: Jose Enrique Soriano

Date given: 2007-11-27

Story:

3rd Annual PopDev Media Awards

Recognition from the 3rd Annual PopDev Media Awards – given to Alecks Pabico for “The Philippines, Now a ‘Second World’ Country?” for his invaluable role in raising public awareness on population and human development issues affecting the lives of Filipinos through online opinion writing from October 1, 2006- August 15, 2007 by the Philippine Legislator’s Committee on Population and Development Foundation, Inc., United Nations Population Fund, Population and Development Strategies Cluster-UNFPA 6th Country Programme, Screening Committees and the Board of Judges for the Print and Online Categories

Recipient: Alecks Pabico

Date given: 2007-11-27

Story:

27th National Book Awards

Finalist for the Best Book of Journalism from the 27th National Book Awards – given to PCIJ for the book “The Rulemakers: How the Wealthy and the Well-Born Dominate Congress – presented by the National Book Development Board and Manila Critics Circle

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2007-11-15

Story:

Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO)- Australian Press Awards

1st Prize from the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO)- Australian Press Awards – given to Vinia Datinguinoo-Mukherjee for “Muslim Classes Come Alive” published on i Report series on Literature and Literacy

Recipient: Vinia Datinguinoo-Mukherjee

Date given: 2007-06

Story:

Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO)- Australian Press Awards

Finalist from the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO)- Australian Press Awards – given to Alecks P. Pabico for “Waste Not, Want Not”

Recipient: Alecks P. Pabico

Date given: 2007

Story:

Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO)- Australian Press Awards

Finalist from the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO)- Australian Press Awards – given to Isa Lorenzo for “A Feminine Challenge”

Recipient: Isa Lorenzo

Date given: 2007

Story:

Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO)- Australian Press Awards

Finalist from the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO)- Australian Press Awards – given to PCIJ fellow Prime Sarmiento for “What’s Swimming in your Soup?”

Recipient: Prime Sarmiento

Date given: 2007

Story:

Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO)- Australian Press Awards

Finalist from the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO)- Australian Press Awards – given to PCIJ fellow Rorie Fajardo for “Still Strangers in their Own Land”

Recipient: Rorie Fajardo

Date given: 2007

Story:

Philippine Blog Awards (News Media Category)

Best Blog from the Philippine Blog Awards (News Media Category) – given to PCIJ

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2007

Story:

2nd Annual PopDev Media Awards

Citation from the 2nd Annual PopDev Media Awards – given to Vinia Datinguinoo for her online news reportage from October 1, 2005- September 30, 2006 by the Philippine Legislator’s Committee on Population and Development Foundation, Inc., United Nations Population Fund, Population and Development Strategies Cluster-UNFPA 6th Country Programme, Screening Committees for NCR, Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao, and the Board of Judges

Recipient: Vinia Datinguinoo

Date given: 2006-12-12

Story:

Developing Asia Journalism Awards (DAJA)

Top Prize (Women and Development Category) from the Developing Asia Journalism Awards (DAJA) – given to Tess Bacalla for “One Year after Quezon Disaster, Women are Leading their Families toward Recovery” published in major newspapers on November 14, 2005

Recipient: Tess Bacalla

Date given: 2006-04-19

Story:

Developing Asia Journalism Awards (DAJA)

1st Runner-up (Poverty Issues Category) from the Developing Asia Journalism Awards (DAJA) – given to Chit Estella for “Substandard Nursing Schools Sell Dreams of a Life Abroad” published in major newspapers on March 21, 2005

Recipient: Chit Estella

Date given: 2006-04-19

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

2nd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to Vinia Mukherjee for “Preparing for Disaster” published in i Report on March-June, 2006

Recipient: Vinia Mukherjee

Date given: 2006

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

3rd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to Vinia Mukherjee for “Preparing for Disaster” published in The Philippine Star, Business Mirror, Malaya, Manila Standard Today, and Sun Star Cebu in August 14-15, 2006

Recipient: Vinia Mukherjee

Date given: 2006

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to Alecks Pabico for “New Rx Needed for Generics Movement” published in Malaya on September 28-29, 2006

Recipient: Alecks Pabico

Date given: 2006

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to Vinia Mukherjee for “Tempest in a (Feeding) Bottle”

Recipient: Vinia Mukherjee

Date given: 2006

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category)

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category) – given to Tess Bacalla for “Boys Town Wards Cry of Sexual Physical Abuse” published in The Philippine Star, The Manila Times, Malaya and Sun Star Cebu on June 12-13, 2006

Recipient: Tess Bacalla

Date given: 2006

Story:

Annual PopDev Media Awards

Best in Online Opinion Writing from the Annual PopDev Media Awards – given to Alecks Pabico for his blog post on the living conditions of thousands of resettled families at the Southville Housing Project

Recipient: Alecks Pabico

Date given: 2005

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

2nd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to Vinia M. Datinguinoo for “Mama can’t eat” published in i Report on January- March, 2005

Recipient: Vinia M. Datinguinoo

Date given: 2005

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category)

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category) – given to Luz Rimban for “Running on taxpayer’s money”

Recipient: Luz Rimban

Date given: 2005

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to Cheryl Chan for “Perils of Generation Sex”

Recipient: Cheryl Chan

Date given: 2005

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category)

3rd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category) – given to Luz Rimban for “Major players elude government’s anti-logging drive in Aurora”

Recipient: Luz Rimban

Date given: 2005

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category)

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category) – given to Avigail M. Olarte for “So young and so trapo”

Recipient: Avigail M. Olarte

Date given: 2005

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to Avigail M. Olarte for “Trained to care”

Recipient: Avigail M. Olarte

Date given: 2005

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to Alan Robles for “Mutants on your plate”

Recipient: Alan Robles

Date given: 2005

Story:

Annual PopDev Media Awards

Best Investigative Report from the Annual PopDev Media Awards – given to Jaileen Jimeno for her two-part series on public access to modern family planning methods

Recipient: Jaileen Jimeno

Date given: 2005

Story:

Rock the Vote ’04 (Edukasyon sa Halalan para sa Kinabukasan)

Appreciation from the Rock the Vote ’04 (Edukasyon sa Halalan para sa Kinabukasan) – given to PCIJ by Grassroot Project for Development.

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2004-05-07

Story:

Philippine Development Innovation Marketplace (Panibagong Paraan-Project Grant Competition)

Finalist from the Philippine Development Innovation Marketplace (Panibagong Paraan-Project Grant Competition) – given to the PCIJ for the “Empowering Citizens through the One-stop Information Site on Philippine Politics and Government”

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2004-01-09

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category)

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category) – given to Yvone T. Chua, with additional reporting by Avigail Olarte and Booma Cruz for “Fat salaries, big allowances and other perks of lawmaking” and “An expensive – and unaccountable – legislature

Recipient: Yvone T. Chua

Date given: 2004

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to Chay Florentino-Hofileña and Aries Rufo for “The showbiz press gets into politics”

Recipient: Chay Florentino-Hofileña and Aries Rufo

Date given: 2004

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

2nd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to Yvonne T. Chua for “Much ado about numbers”

Recipient: Yvonne T. Chua

Date given: 2004

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category)

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category) – given to Yvonne T. Chua and Booma B. Cruz for “Pork is a political, not a developmental, tool,”

Recipient: Yvonne T. Chua and Booma B. Cruz

Date given: 2004

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category)

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category) – given to Luz Rimban for “In Tarlac, CARP gives land to the wealthy” published in Business World, Cebu Daily News, Malaya and Mindanao Daily Mirror on July 5-6, 2004 by the Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility and the Ateneo de Manila University

Recipient: Luz Rimban

Date given: 2004

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to Cecile C.A. Balgos for “Half-truths in advertising” published in i Magazine on January- June 2004

Recipient: Cecile C.A. Balgos

Date given: 2004

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to Ibarra C. Mateo for “Spinning the news”

Recipient: Ibarra C. Mateo

Date given: 2004

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

2nd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to Yvonne T. Chua for “Much ado about numbers”

Recipient: Yvonne T. Chua

Date given: 2004

Story:

2002 National Book Award

2002 National Book Award – given to PCIJ for the book “Investigating Corruption” edited by Sheila S. Coronel and Lorna Kalaw-Tirol by the Manila Critics Circle, National Commission for Culture and the Arts and the National Book Development Board

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2003-08-30

Story:

Public Service Award from the Bantay Katarungan

Public Service Award from the Bantay Katarungan – given to PCIJ for its fearless in-depth reportage on the Narvasa Court, for its documented reports on the former President Joseph Estrada, his wealth, his mistresses and his cronies, for its impartial, no-nonsense investigative reporting on the GMA Administration, shortly after it came to power, and for its remarkable initiative and exceptional courage in performing its task under three different administrations, admirable sense of fairness and unimpeachable integrity, and for its respect for the facts and the available evidence

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2003-02-08

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category)

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category) – given to Tess Bacalla for “BIR officials amass unexplained wealth”

Recipient: Tess Bacalla

Date given: 2003

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

2nd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to the PCIJ Team for “Who was responsible for the IMPSA deal?”

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2003

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category)

3rd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Explanatory Category) – given to Jose Torres Jr. for “The Making of the Mindanao Mafia”

Recipient: Jose Torres Jr.

Date given: 2003

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category)

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category) – given to Yvonne T. Chua for “Corruption still goes on at DepEd filed offices”

Recipient: Yvonne T. Chua

Date given: 2003

Story:

Ramon Magsaysay Award for Journalism, Literature and Creative Communication Arts

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel

Date given: 2003

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Luz Rimban and Sheila Samonte-Pesayco for “Trail of power mess leads to Ramos”

Recipient: Luz Rimban and Sheila Samonte-Pesayco

Date given: 2002

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

3rd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Malou C. Mangahas for “The Estrada plunder case, Year 1: Trial of the century’s may take ages to finish”

Recipient: Malou C. Mangahas

Date given: 2002

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Marites Sison for “Garbage problem rooted in money and politics”

Recipient: Marites Sison

Date given: 2002

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Luz Rimban for “A dangerous place to be a journalist”

Recipient: Luz Rimban

Date given: 2002

Story:

2000 National Book Award for Journalism

2000 National Book Award for Journalism – given to PCIJ for the book “Betrayal of the Public Trust: Investigative Reports on Corruption” edited by Sheila S. Coronel – presented by the Manila Critics Circle and the National Commission for Culture and the Arts

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2001-09-08

Story:

The Chino Roces Freedom Award of the year

The Chino Roces Freedom Award of the year – given to PCIJ for seeking and revealing the truth, with outstanding courage and professional competence, so the people may know

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2001-08-27

Story:

Public Service Award for Pioneering and Exemplary Public Service

Public Service Award for Pioneering and Exemplary Public Service – given to PCIJ by the Ateneo de Manila University

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2001-07-25

Story:

Recognition from the House of Representatives (Committee on Civil, Political and Human Rights, Office of the Speaker and AKBAYAN

Recognition from the House of Representatives (Committee on Civil, Political and Human Rights, Office of the Speaker and AKBAYAN – given to PCIJ for their unwavering commitment to true, fair and fearless reporting: for the risks they took and sacrifices endured and for their immeasurable contribution to the phenomenon that was People Power II

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2001-03-01

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

2nd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Sheila Samonte-Pesayco for “GSIS insurance monopoly: ‘A never-ending scam’

Recipient: Sheila Samonte-Pesayco

Date given: 2001

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category)

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards (Investigative Category) – given to Luz Rimban and Mike F. Leonen for “In haste in government approval of IMPSA power project deal” published in Business World, TODAY, The Freeman on April 1-3, 2001 and Cebu Daily News on March 31- April 2, 2001

Recipient: Luz Rimban and Mike F. Leonen

Date given: 2001

Story:

One of the Top 10 Newsmakers of the Year from the Bulong-Pulungan

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2000-12-12

Story:

1999 National Book Award

1999 National Book Award – given to PCIJ for the book “From Loren to Marimar: The Philippine Media in the 1990s” edited by Sheila S. Coronel by the Manila Critics Circle and the National Commission for Culture and the Arts

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 2000-09-09

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Yvonne T. Chua, Sheila S. Coronel and Vinia M. Datinguinoo for “Can Estrada Explain his Wealth?” (published in Business World, Philippine Post, Pinoy Times, Sun Star Manila, Cebu Daily News, Sun Star Cebu, Freeman, Today, and Philippine Collegian on July 25-26, 2000), Ma, Lourdes Mangahas and Luz Rimban for “First Family’s Firm Flouts the Law” (published in Business World, Pinoy Times, Philippine Star and Philippine Collegian on August 21, 2000), and Sheila Coronel for “Erap and Families” (published in i Magazine on September 2000)

Recipient: Yvonne T. Chua, Sheila S. Coronel and Vinia M. Datinguinoo

Date given: 2000

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

3rd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Marites Dañguilan-Vitug and Glenda Gloria for “Cronies scramble to get Clark casino for Estrada”

Recipient: Marites Dañguilan-Vitug and Glenda Gloria

Date given: 2000

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Prime Sarmiento for “Corruption and waste weigh down agriculture”

Recipient: Prime Sarmiento

Date given: 2000

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Luz Rimban and Mike Leonen for “Baguio forest cut down to build ‘Cronyville’”

Recipient: Luz Rimban and Mike Leonen

Date given: 2000

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Yvonne T. Chua for “Up to 65% of textbook funds goes to bribes”

Recipient: Yvonne T. Chua

Date given: 1999

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

2nd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Chay Florentino- Hofileña and Ian Sayson for “Centennial Expo: convenient cover for election fundraising”

Recipient: Chay Florentino- Hofileña and Ian Sayson

Date given: 1999

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Sheila S. Coronel for “Into the Light” published in i Magazine on January-March 1999

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel

Date given: 1999

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Marites Sison for “In a bind, many single mothers leave their kids in orphanages”

Recipient: Marites Sison

Date given: 1999

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Jaileen Jimeno for “Government women’s budget goes to frivolous projects”

Recipient: Jaileen Jimeno

Date given: 1999

Story:

National Book Awards

Award for Journalism from the National Book Awards – given to Yvonne T. Chua for “Robbed: An Investigation of Corruption in Philippine Education”

Recipient: Yvonne T. Chua

Date given: 1999

Story:

National Book Awards

Award for Media from the National Book Awards – given to Sheila S. Coronel (editor) for “From Loren to Marimar: The Philippine Media in the 1990s”

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel (editor)

Date given: 1999

Story:

National Book Awards

Finalist for Journalism from the National Book Awards – given to Cecile C. A. Balgos (editor) for “Her Stories: Investigative Reports on Filipino Women in the 1990s”

Recipient: Cecile C. A. Balgos (editor)

Date given: 1999

Story:

National Book Awards

Finalist for Documentation from the National Book Awards – given to Cecile C. A. Balgos (editor) for “News in Distress: The Southeast Asian Media in a Time of Crisis”

Recipient: Cecile C. A. Balgos (editor)

Date given: 1999

Story:

Louie R. Prieto Journalism Awards

Finalist from Louie R. Prieto Journalism Awards – given to Yvonne T. Chua for “As much as 65% of Textbook Funds Goes to Bribes”

Recipient: Yvonne T. Chua

Date given: 1999

Story:

Centennial Year Journalism Award

Centennial Year Journalism Award from the RCM Marcelo H. del Pilar – given to Sheila S. Coronel and Ellen Tordesillas for their exposition of the purchase by the Amari Corporation of reclaimed land from the Philippine Estates Authority (PEA)

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel and Ellen Tordesillas

Date given: 1998-06-18

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Sheila S. Coronel and Ellen Tordesillas for “The Grandmother of all scams”

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel and Ellen Tordesillas

Date given: 1998

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Yvonne T. Chua for “DECS plagued by ‘ghost’ deliveries”

Recipient: Yvonne T. Chua

Date given: 1998

Story:

National Book Awards

Award for Journalism from the National Book Awards – given to Sheila S. Coronel (editor) for “Pork and other Perks: Corruption and Governance in the Philippines”

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel (editor)

Date given: 1998

Story:

Louie R. Prieto Journalism Awards

3rd Prize from Louie R. Prieto Journalism Awards – given to Alecks P. Pabico for “Law on tribal rights reaches a dead end”

Recipient: Alecks P. Pabico

Date given: 1998

Story:

National Book Award for Journalism from the Manila Critics Circle

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 1998

Story:

Benigno S. Aquino, Jr. Fellowship for Media

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel

Date given: 1998

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Sheila S. Coronel for “Justice to the highest bidder”

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel

Date given: 1997

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

2nd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Claire Tielens for “God’s own assembly line”

Recipient: Claire Tielens

Date given: 1997

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Rachel Khan for “Comelec: Weighed but found wanting”

Recipient: Rachel Khan

Date given: 1997

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Colleen Chien for “Energy policy keeps 17 million Filipinos in the dark”

Recipient: Colleen Chien

Date given: 1997

Story:

National Book Awards

Finalist for Journalism from the National Book Awards – given to Yvonne T. Chua (editor) for “Uncovering the Beat: The Real-World Guide to Reporting on Government”

Recipient: Yvonne T. Chua (editor)

Date given: 1997

Story:

National Book Awards

Finalist for Journalism from the National Book Awards – given to Danilo Arao, Yvonne T. Chua and Alecks P. Pabico for “The Electronic Trail: A Guide to Computer-Assisted Research and Reporting in the Philippines”

Recipient: Danilo Arao, Yvonne T. Chua and Alecks P. Pabico

Date given: 1997

Story:

National Book Awards

Finalist for Biography from the National Book Awards – given to Maria Rosa Henson for “Comfort Woman: Slave of Destiny”

Recipient: Maria Rosa Henson

Date given: 1997

Story:

Louie R. Prieto Journalism Awards

Finalist from Louie R. Prieto Journalism Awards – given to Howie G. Severino for “Nasugbu farmers lose out to tourism”

Recipient: Howie G. Severino

Date given: 1996-10

Story:

Excellence in Writing on Women and AIDS

1st Runner-up for Excellence in Writing on Women and AIDS – given to Cecile C.A. Balgos by the AIDSCAP Women’s Initiative of Family Health International and Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS

Recipient: Cecile C.A. Balgos

Date given: 1996-07-09

Story:

Benigno S. Aquino, Jr. Fellowhip for Media

Recipient: Howie G. Severino

Date given: 1996

Story:

National Book Award for Journalism from the Manila Critics Circle

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 1996

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

3rd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Chay Florentino-Hofileña for “Profits from disaster”

Recipient: Chay Florentino-Hofileña

Date given: 1996

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Sheila S. Coronel for “Squeeze Play on the North Luzon Expressway”

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel

Date given: 1996

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Sheila S. Coronel for “Asian ‘tigers’ feast on sharks”

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel

Date given: 1996

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Gemma Luz Corotan for “Corruption charges hound Ramiro”

Recipient: Gemma Luz Corotan

Date given: 1996

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Marites Dañguilan-Vitug and Eric Gutierrez for “Misuari faces big headaches”

Recipient: Marites Dañguilan-Vitug and Eric Gutierrez

Date given: 1996

Story:

National Book Awards

Award for Journalism from the National Book Awards – given to Sheila S. Coronel (editor) for “Patrimony: Six Case Studies on Environment and Local Politics in the Philippines”

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel (editor)

Date given: 1996

Story:

2nd Place for Best Documentary

2nd Place for Best Documentary from the Cultural Center of the Philippines – given to PCIJ for “No Time for Play”

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 1996

Story:

Benigno S. Aquino, Jr. Fellowhip for Media

Recipient: Howie G. Severino

Date given: 1996

Story:

Asian American Journalists Association National Awards (Photography – Unlimited Subject Matter)

1st Place from the Asian American Journalists Association National Awards (Photography – Unlimited Subject Matter) – given to Rick Rocamora for “Caged” Manila’s Invisible Children”

Recipient: Rick Rocamora

Date given: 1995-08-24

Story:

National Book Awards

Award for Journalism from the National Book Awards – given to Jose F. Lacaba for “Boss: Five Case Studies of Local Politics in the Philippines”

Recipient: Jose F. Lacaba

Date given: 1995

Story:

National Book Awards

Finalist for Journalism from the National Book Awards – given to Cecille C. A. Balgos for “The Child with a Fish for a Twin (Or how not to write about children)”

Recipient: Cecille C. A. Balgos

Date given: 1995

Story:

National Book Awards

Award for Photojournalism from the National Book Awards – given to Alex Baluyut and Gemma Luz Corotan for “Brother Hood”

Recipient: Alex Baluyut and Gemma Luz Corotan

Date given: 1995

Story:

National Book Awards

Finalist for Environment from the National Book Awards – given to Howie G. Severino (editor) for “The Green Guide: A Sourcebook on the Philippine Environment”

Recipient: Howie G. Severino (editor)

Date given: 1995

Story:

National Book Award for Journalism from the Manila Critics Circle

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 1995

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

2nd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to PCIJ with the Institute for Popular Democracy for “Jueteng thrives in the Ramos heartland”

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism with the Institute for Popular Democracy

Date given: 1995

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Gemma Luz Corotan for “The meteoric rise of Hilarion Ramiro”

Recipient: Gemma Luz Corotan

Date given: 1995

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Gemma Luz Corotan for “The NFA: Tailor-made for corruption”

Recipient: Gemma Luz Corotan

Date given: 1995

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Howie G. Severino for “Widespread fraud mars DENR flagship program”

Recipient: Howie G. Severino

Date given: 1995

Story:

Annual Science and Technology Journalism Awards

Honorable Mention from the Annual Science and Technology Journalism Awards – given to Sheila Coronel by the Philippine Press Institute and the Philippine Geothermal, Inc.

Recipient: Sheila Coronel

Date given: 1994-12-07

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Howie G. Severino for “Chemical Giant Evades Ban on Deadly Products”

Recipient: Howie G. Severino

Date given: 1994

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Stella Tirol-Cadiz for “Tan Yu’s projects: Grand plans but little achievement”

Recipient: Stella Tirol-Cadiz

Date given: 1994

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Earl and Disraeli Parreño for “Hostages of war”

Recipient: Earl and Disraeli Parreño

Date given: 1994

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to J. R. Alibutud for “Filipino war veterans: American dream ends in nightmare”

Recipient: J. R. Alibutud

Date given: 1994

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Eric Gutierrez for “House of Representatives’ business interests: Congressmen violate conflict-of-interest rule”

Recipient: Eric Gutierrez

Date given: 1993

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

2nd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Eileen Mangubat and Marites Sison-Paez for “Hooked on Nubain: Indictable pain-killer lures Cebu addicts”

Recipient: Eileen Mangubat and Marites Sison-Paez

Date given: 1993

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

3rd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Yasmin Arquiza for “The Green Evolution: The environmental movement at the crossroads”

Recipient: Yasmin Arquiza

Date given: 1993

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Stella Tirol-Cadiz for “Millions at stake in lotto war”

Recipient: Stella Tirol-Cadiz

Date given: 1993

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Award

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Stella Tirol-Cadiz for “Judiciary on trial: Unethical practices of justices”

Recipient: Stella Tirol-Cadiz

Date given: 1993

Story:

National Book Awards

Award for Journalism from the National Book Awards – given to Marites Dañguilan-Vitug for “Power from the Forest: The Politics of Logging”

Recipient: Marites Dañguilan-Vitug

Date given: 1993

Story:

Catholic Press Awards

Best Book from the Catholic Press Awards – given to PCIJ for “Kudeta: The Challenge to Philippine Democracy”

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 1992-03-14

Story:

Recognition from the Earth Savers Movement

Given to PCIJ for the Development and Rehabilitation of the Environment through Arts, Media and Science in consonance with the 1992 UN Earth Summit Goals by DREAMS Honor Roll Earth Day

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 1992

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Sheila S. Coronel, Malou C. Mangahas, Howie G. Severino, Eric Gamalinda, Stella Tirol, Lan Mercado and Cecille C. A. Balgos for “Hard times: The challenge to President Ramos”

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel, Malou C. Mangahas, Howie G. Severino, Eric Gamalinda, Stella Tirol, Lan Mercado and Cecille C. A. Balgos

Date given: 1992

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

2nd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Sheila S. Coronel for “The making of the President: 1992”

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel

Date given: 1992

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Stella Tirol-Cadiz for “De Venecia’s debt trail”

Recipient: Stella Tirol-Cadiz

Date given: 1992

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Sheila S. Coronel for “Wounded earth: T’bolis fight for their ancestral land”

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel

Date given: 1992

Story:

National Book Awards

Award for Anthology from the National Book Awards – given to PCIJ for “Saving the Earth: The Philippine Experience”

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 1992

Story:

Press Freedom Award from the Annual (Philippine Movement for Press Freedom) PMPF Awards

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 1991-08-30

Story:

Likas Yaman Award from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR)

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 1991-06-27

Story:

Recognition from the Communicators’ League for Environmental Action and Restoration (CLEAR)

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 1991-03-21

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Marites Sison-Paez for “Like a rolling stone: Manila’s homeless”

Recipient: Marites Sison-Paez

Date given: 1991

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Carolyn O. Arguillas for “Money for nothing: Kidnappings are big business”

Recipient: Carolyn O. Arguillas

Date given: 1991

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Editha Erecre Eco for “Married to the M.O.B. (Mail-Order Bride)”

Recipient: Editha Erecre Eco

Date given: 1991

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Howie G. Severino for “Marijuana: Principal crop in roadless Ifugao town”

Recipient: Howie G. Severino

Date given: 1991

Story:

Catholic Mass Media Awards

Best Book Award from the Catholic Mass Media – given to PCIJ for “Kudeta: the Challenge to Philippine Democracy”

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 1990

Story:

National Book Awards

Award for Anthology from the National Book Awards – given to PCIJ for “Kudeta: the Challenge to Philippine Democracy”

Recipient: Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism

Date given: 1990

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards was given to Malou C. Mangahas for “The traffic in human organs”

Recipient: Malou C. Mangahas

Date given: 1990

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards was given to Red Batario and Girlie Alvarez for “One million have fled their homes to escape fighting”

Recipient: Red Batario and Girlie Alvarez

Date given: 1990

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – for “Chaos in the courts”

Recipient: Cecile C. A. Balgos

Date given: 1990

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

1st Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Constantino Tejero for “Censorship in Philippine movies and television”

Recipient: Constantino Tejero

Date given: 1990

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

3rd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards – given to Sheila S. Coronel for “Agrarian Reform” published in the Philippine Daily Inquirer from April 24-26, 1989 by the Institute of Business and Government

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel

Date given: 1989-10-03

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

Finalist from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards was given to Sheila S. Coronel for “Right- wing evangelicals”

Recipient: Sheila S. Coronel

Date given: 1989

Story:

Jaime V. Ongpin Awards

2nd Prize from the Jaime V. Ongpin Awards was given to Ceres P. Doyo for “The AIDS threat”

Recipient: Ceres P. Doyo

Date given: 1989

Story:

“We wish to commend the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism for a job well done on its three-part series on President Arroyo’s still-to-be-explained wealth. The press serves a watchdog function and, disagreeable as it may be to those who have suffered its nasty bite, we must allow the press to perform this function, without coercion or threats. “It now behoves the President to personally respond to the issues raised by the PCIJ article. It is unfortunate that instead of clarifying matters, the President has opted to call in her legal advisers who have tried to attack the message as well as the messenger rather than respond in any meaningful and germane manner. “In particular, the business community would be particularly interested in the remarkable growth of Mrs. Arroyo’s net worth during her incumbency as a government employee from 1992 to 2008, when her personal wealth increased from P6.73 million to P143.54 million, according to the PCIJ account. That equates to a compounded growth of 21.1% per annum, wherein her net worth doubled every 3.4 years. Her stock portfolio, meanwhile, grew by 41% per annum from P55 million in 2006 to P110 million in 2008, at a time when the Philippine Stock Exchange index fell by 21%. “Held against the light of economic reality and the First Couple’s declared assets and income sources, the impressive growth of Mrs. Arroyo’s wealth is difficult to fathom. Through her lawyer, the President has stated that she stands by the “truth and veracity” of her SALN, but it is difficult to accept her statement at face value if all that she has to substantiate her claim is the paltry information provided in the document and her spokespersons’ explanations that only lead to more unanswered questions. “Like Caesar’s wife, the President must be above suspicion. As the highest public servant in our country and in the interest of good governance, Mrs. Arroyo must set an example by making a full and transparent accounting of her and her family’s wealth. She owes the Filipino people an explanation.”

From the statement of the Makati Business Club on the PCIJ’s three-part investigative report, “Can President Arroyo Explain Her Wealth?” – August 12, 2009

2009

Few non-profit groups win the kind of accolades showered on the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism. “The people who impressed me the most were the PCIJ,” says Roderick Macdonell, who ran the World Bank’s investigative reporting program for five years. “They were doing just incredibly courageous work, and under threat at times,” adds Suzanne Siskel, who ran the Ford Foundation office in Manila during the late 1990s. “They always kept their integrity; they always were doing very innovative work.” Founded in 1989 with a few hundred dollars and a single typewriter, the PCIJ has grown into the gold standard for investigative reporting in Asia. The Center is best known for its series on the hidden wealth of President Joseph Estrada, which forced his resignation, but the PCIJ’s impact goes far beyond that scandal. Its reporters have broken hundreds of stories in print, radio, TV, and online, produced eight documentaries, and written two dozen books, meticulously documenting official corruption and corporate abuse. Its trainers have almost single-handedly educated a generation of investigative journalism in the Philippines and spread their know-how across Asia. The Center’s alumni, moreover, are now ensconced at major TV stations, newspapers, online sites, and universities.

From the Global Investigative Journalism: Strategies for Support – A Report to the Center for International Media Assistance – “A Model for Muckracking: The Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism”

2007-12-05

The PCIJ “is the foundation stone of the Philippine media… It’s brave, and it’s necessary. They went ahead of the other media.”

from an interview with Doreen Fernandez with San Francisco Chronicle, Department of Communication, Ateneo de Manila University

2000-12-09

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