The coronavirus pandemic hit the poor disproportionately in the Philippines. The country's lockdown restrictions – one of the strictest in the world – severely affected many people's livelihood. 

In Rizal province, members of the Dumagat tribe living in isolated upland villages have remained free from Covid-19 but lockdowns made it difficult for them to sell their produce and earn their livelihood. 

In Cebu City, the pandemic forced many drivers of tartanilla – horse-drawn carriages that hark back to the Spanish occupation – out of the streets because the tourists have stopped coming. Many had to find alternative livelihood. 

In Metro Manila, the pandemic compounded the struggles of informal settler communities without access to clean water. As lockdowns hit their livelihood, fighting Covid-19 with frequent handwashing has become a luxury they can't afford because they can barely save money to buy water to drink and cook their food with. 

Watch these videos produced under the PCIJ Covid-19 Explainer Project. 

 


 

 ISOLATED PHILIPPINE COMMUNITIES ARE SAFE FROM CORONAVIRUS BUT NOT FROM HUNGER 

 

 


 

CEBU CITY'S FEW REMAINING TARTANILLA DRIVERS FIGHT FOR SURVIVAL AMID PANDEMIC

 

 


 

PANDEMIC UNDERSCORES STRUGGLES OF MANILA'S URBAN POOR COMMUNITIES WITHOUT ACCESS TO CLEAN WATER

 

 

 

*TOP PHOTO by Cherry Salazar


 

READ PCIJ's LATEST INVESTIGATIVE REPORTS

 

PCIJ request for Duterte SALN runs into dead end – again


44M kilos of fertilizer from South Korea shipped to Philippine landfill


For banks that backed PH coal boom, the path to renewable energy comes with roadblocks


Philippine artisanal fishermen cry for help as illegal fishing empties municipal waters

 


Follow PCIJ on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.