Alecks P. Pabico

ALECKS is the Head of the newly formed Multimedia Desk of the PCIJ. Previously he was the Center’s online manager and doubled as assistant to the Training Director.

As multimedia director, he is responsible for overseeing output — content and form — of the PCIJ Web portal and its subsidiary sites (main organizational site, blog, database site, etc.), ensuring editorial integrity and high quality across multimedia platforms.

Alecks’s present work expands on his tasks as online manager, when he was mainly responsible for the design and maintenance of the PCIJ website — www.pcij.org — since 1996, i-site.ph, the Center’s information site on Philippine politics and government, and recently Inside PCIJ, the Center’s institutional blog (pcij.org/blog) — named the best news and media blog at the 2007 Philippine Blog Awards in March.

As online manager, he also served as the administrator of PCIJ-maintained electronic lists for local and foreign journalists, including a regional newsgroup on access to information in Southeast Asia.

As journalism trainer, he has trained scores of local and Southeast Asian journalists, journalism educators and campus writers in the areas of investigative reporting, computer-assisted journalism, newspaper and web design, blogging, and digital audio editing.

He also writes investigative reports for newspapers and TV, as well as regular articles for the Center’s investigative reporting magazine, i Report (now online and monthly), and the PCIJ blog.

Alecks has done a number of investigative reports on pressing social and environmental concerns, such as agrarian reform, working women, drug offenders, migrant workers, the rights of indigenous peoples, harmful aquaculture operations and the plight of Filipino seafarers. He won third prize in the 3rd Louie R. Prieto Journalism Awards in 1999 for his report on the plight of the country’s indigenous peoples titled “One Year After: Landmark Law on Indigenous Peoples Hits a Dead End.”

He won in the 2nd PopDev Media Awards last December for a blog post on the health situation at the Southville Housing Project, a relocation site for railway settlers, which was cited as best online opinion writing tackling population and development issues.

He was one of ten Southeast Asian journalists who were awarded the Southeast Asian Press Alliance (SEAPA) journalism fellowship in 2004, which brought him to Cambodia to report on the kingdom’s emerging information society.

Alecks was the editor in chief of the Philippine Collegian of the University of the Philippines during the 1991-’92 term. He was also the first editor of the Arkiglyphics, the student publication of the College of Architecture in U.P. Diliman.